And the beat goes on

It might be within the realm of possibility for us to say, “we really hate to keep beating this drum,” but we don’t feel that way.

We have several blogs posts on the Restless Shores website that mention the many, many people that have naysaid or minimized our project. It was not fun to have to sit and listen to someone looking over the top of their glasses at us and tell us it won’t work. No matter how nicely they said it, it still stung. Even worse than bruised feelings, we would doubt our faith in the success of Restless Shores.

We did believe in this project. It wasn’t just a gut feeling. There is data out there. Once again someone else used the same data we used. Writing for the March 2019 edition of the Smithsonian Magazine, Lorraine Ali penned “Plot Twist! The much-maligned soap opera has been resurrected as prestige TV.” Ms. Ali also pointed out the huge social impact soap operas have had on not just our culture, but cultures across the world. She also pointed out that the lady credited with the creation of the daytime televised soap opera, Irna Phillips, was encouraged by input from critics like, “Last week television caught the dread disease of radio – soapoperitis,” and “of no visual interest.”

Kind of sounds like the stuff we were hearing. “No one listens to them,” “the people who watch televised melodramas aren’t interested in podcasts,” “Millennials don’t know what soap operas are,” “no one else is doing this” and “podcast aren’t really an entertainment venue.”

We invested our own funds into the project, because the small business loan money guys didn’t think a podcast soap opera was worth funding. We’re glad we had the imagination to move forward, even though so many others don’t think it’s a thing.

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